Cart
Higher protein intake affects males and females differently

Researchers convinced 51 sedentary male and female millennials (18-25 yrs old) to start a 5-times-per-week strength and endurance program that lasted for 6 months. How? Free food, of course!       

Twice per day they received 42 grams of protein or a calorie-equivalent carbohydrate supplement. Males in the protein group had bigger gains in bench press strength after three months (+54.2 pounds) vs. the carb group (+31.5 pounds) and after six months (+75.8 pounds vs. +41.2 pounds). Both female groups had a similar change in strength.

Females in the protein group lost more fat mass (-3.7 pounds) compared to the carb group (-0.2 pounds), but changes in lean mass were similar. Males lost a similar amount of fat in each group, but the protein group gained more lean mass (+5.7 pounds) compared to the carb group (+4.9 pounds).

Researchers highlighted the fact that women in the protein group lost 40% to 85% more fat mass than men in both the protein and carb groups. On the contrary, men in the protein group gained 15% to 30% more lean mass than women in the protein and carb groups.

The total daily protein intake of each group ended up being around 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight each day (1 g/lb/day) in the protein group and 0.5 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight each day (0.5 g/lb/day) in the carb group.

When starting an exercise program, targeting a protein intake of 1g/lb/day can help maximize strength and body composition results. Essentially, determine your ideal body weight and consume that many grams of protein a day.

If you are a female, it may help you lose more fat. If you are a male, it may boost your strength and lean mass gains.

 

Previous Next Back to Top
More Related Articles